Highfield Primary School

Consideration Aspiration Responsibility Enjoyment

Bridgenorth Avenue, Urmston, Manchester, M41 9PA

highfield.admin@trafford.gov.uk

0161 748 6096

Class 3 Previous Home Learning

 

Please find previous weeks' home learning below...

 

Week beginning 11/05/20

 

Monday

Phonics:

  • Warm up with Grab a Giggling Grapheme game  of the correct level for your child.
  • Read a phonics comics  of the correct level for your child and discuss any new sounds or words they might have come across. 

English: 

Year 1:

  • This week you are going to host a party, so we need to get started planning it. Sadly we can't invite all of our friends and family to really come around to our house, so you might need to get creative. Are you having the party just for your family in your household or are you having a teddy bear's party or inviting some of your toys? Could you invite wider family and friends and have the party over a video call. Discuss this with your adult and make your decision. I have suggested that you have the party on Thursday, but you can chose a day that suits you. Now lets start planning your party. have a look at this party planning sheet here. If you don't have a printer just copy out each heading onto a piece of paper and decorate it yourself. Please write in full sentences for each box.

 

Year 2

  • Complete Year 1 work but for each sentence you must include and 'and' to extend and expand your sentences and ideas. Also remember when you are writing people's names that they must start with a capital letter. If you are listing ideas try to add in some commas like we discussed last week for expanded noun phrases. All of these little details help to elevate your work to Year 2 level.

 

Maths:

For maths this week it will look slightly different. White Rose Maths, which is the maths scheme that we follow in school, has produced a series of online learning videos with accompanying worksheets/questions. This week we shall be following them as they teach us about weight and capacity. These are new topics for this children but are ones that can be taught quite well remotely from home so we have decided to try it out. Despite producing planning schemes for mixed Year 1 and Year 2 classes, they have not produced mixed year group videos. So the way that I have structured it is that everyone will do the Year 1 videos and worksheets, with then additional higher level problem solving questions for Year 2. The daily link will take you to the all of the Year 1 work. Simply scroll down to the bottom of the page to where it says Week 1, open that up and then just select the video and worksheet that I have indicated is for today to do (answers are also included). Some of the questions seem simple at first but lots of opportunity is built in for reasoning, problem solving and discussion, so please explore this thoroughly with your child to allow them to show their depth of understanding. Enjoy!

Year 1:

 Year 2:

  • Complete Year 1 work and then have a go at this additional problem. Can you work out who is correct and who is incorrect? How do you know? Can you write a sentence explaining your answers?

 

Tuesday

Phonics: 

  • Warm up with flashcard speed trial  game, pressing the tick if your child correctly says the sound and a cross if they make a mistake.
  • Read a phonics comic  of the correct level for your child and discuss any new sounds or words they might have come across.

English:

Year 1:

  • Today we are going to write our invitations for the party. A very important part of writing an invitation is telling the person what day of the week the party will be on. By the end of Year 1 we need to be able to read and write the days of the week accurately, so lets practise this a bit more. Try writing out the days of the week from memory. Now have a go at this days of the week word search. Once you have done look back at your spellings of the days of the week and correct any that you need to. Practise these ones until confident, remembering that days of the week always start with a capital letter.
  • Now you are ready to write your invitation. You can design your own invitation, use old ones you may have left over from a previous part, or use this template here.

Year 2:

  • Today we are going to write our invitations for the party. A very important part of writing an invitation is telling the person what day of the week the party will be on. We have done quite a bit of work on writing out the days of the week so you should be familiar with how they are spelt. Warm up by writing them all out and check that you have spelt them all correctly. Now you need to help me, because someone (is it those gremlins again?) have mixed up all the letters in the days of the week. Can you unscramble them? A little hint is that the days of the week always start with a capital letter.

  • Now you are ready to write your invitation. You can design your own invitation, use old ones you may have left over from a previous part, or use this template here.

 

Maths:

Year 1:

  • Watch Lesson 2: Measure Mass video and click on Get the Activity to answer the questions.
  • Have a go at this fun weighing problem solving game here.

 

Year 2:

  • Complete Year 1 work then have a go at this additional problem. Think carefully about the answer.

 

 Wednesday

Phonics:

  • Warm up with Tricky Word Trucks looking at HFW (high frequency words) of the correct level for your child.
  • Play Picnic on Pluto  game focusing on reading words and deciding if they are real or nonsense words. Can you beat your previous score?

English:

Year 1:

  • The party is tomorrow so we need to start thinking about what we are going to serve our guests, as we cant have a party without party food. Part of our DT (design and technology) is about cooking and nutrition so this will fit in very nicely. Decide with your adult at least one item that you are going to make for your party. This does not have to be super complicated and require lots of ingredients and effort. Some examples include sandwiches with a variety of fillings, cornflake cakes, cupcakes, fruit kebabs or even a funky fruity mocktail drink.
  • On a piece of paper write the title 'ingredients' and underline it. Then underneath write 'you will need...' Now write a list of all of the ingredients that you will need to make your chosen party food item. Remember that lists are set out differently from writing a story, each item is written underneath the one before it.
  • Now write the heading 'equipment' and underline it. Write a list of what equipment you will need to make your party food item.

Year 2: 

  • Complete the list just like Year 1, but adding in commas after each item in the list. By now you should be fantastic at forming these commas as you have had lots of practise during the past few weeks.

Maths:

Year 1:

  • Watch Lesson 3: Compare mass video and click on Get the Activity to answer the questions.
  • Then have a go at this tricky problem. It will require you to think about all that you have learnt over the past 3 days about weight and apply it in a problem solving method.

 

 Year 2:

  • Complete Year 1 video and worksheet.
  • In Year 2 we also need to be able to read weighing scales in their units of kilograms (Kg) and grams (g). We have looked at reading units before so this should just be a refresher. Remember, the number that the arrow is pointing to is how heavy something is. Have a go at these questions.

  • Show what you have learnt by playing this fun postman game. Start with kg and half kg, then move to 100g when confident.

 

 

Thursday

Phonics:

  • Warm up with Tricky Word Trucks  this time looking at looking at tricky words (what RWI calls red words) of the correct level for your child.
  • Play Dragon’s Den game a different variation of Picnic on Pluto. Can you beat your previous score?

English:

Year 1 and Year 2:

  • Today is the day of the party. Make sure you leave enough time to make your chosen party food. Read through your lists from yesterday and get everything ready before you start. Maybe see if you or an adult can take photos of each different stage in the making, as this might help you tomorrow when you have to write instructions to make your party food.
  • Now it's time to get ready for the party, perhaps you can make some decorations to make it special. Remember that role play is such an important part of children's learning and understanding and a great way to practise all of those speaking and listening skills that are part of our English curriculum. Important things to focus on are speaking in full sentences with correct grammar, using appropriate topic based vocabulary, good eye contact when both speaking and listening and using appropriate tone and volume.
  • Enjoy your party and I can't wait to see all of the photos that you send me.

Maths:

Year 1 

  • We are now looking at capacity, so what Lesson 4: Introduce capacity and volume video and click on Get the Activity to answer the questions.
  • Collect lots of different container from around your house such as cups, bowls, bottles etc. Ask an adult to give you an instruction such as 'make it half full' and use water to carry it out. Repeat with different capacities such as half empty, full, empty, nearly full and nearly empty. Talk about what you notice with an adult as you do this.

 

Year 2:

  • Complete year 1 activities then have a go at this additional problem.
  •  

 

 

Friday

Phonics:

  • Warm up with flashcard speed trial game, pressing the tick if your child correctly says the sound and a cross if they make a mistake.
  • Play Help a Hedgehog speed word challenge game  to see how many words you can correctly read in the time. Can you beat your previous score?

  

English:

Year 1:

  • Now you are going to write instructions for how to make your chosen party food. Instructions have to be really clear and detailed so that anyone can follow them and make the exact same thing that you made. There are a few rules when writing instructions. They should always start with a imperative (bossy) verb, such as 'cut', 'put', 'mix' or 'chop'. They should not be a recount of what you did, so they are written in the present tense not the past tense, and you never use the pronoun 'I'.
  • When writing your instructions you need to make sure you think of every step that you did (this is where the photos may come in useful) and not miss any out as this might make it too complicate for someone to follow. Remember all the usual rules of writing apply here such as capital letters, full stops, finger spaces and neat letter formation. Try numbering your instructions to make it easier for someone to follow.

 

Year 2:

  • You are going to write instructions just like Year 1. However, you will need to start each instruction with a time opener, such as first, then, next, last. This will help your writing flow more and help you with organising it. Also try and include some connectives in your sentences such as 'and' 'but' or 'because'.

Maths:

 Year 1:

  • Watch Lesson 5: Measure capacity and click on Get the Activity to answer the questions.
  • Have a go at measuring capacity at home. Find a large container like a jug and a smaller container like a cup. How many cups does it take to fill the jug completely? Record your results. Then find another large container such as a bowl, and repeat measuring with the small cups. Record your results. What does this tell you?  Which has the largest capacity? How do you know?

 

Year 2: 

  • Complete year 1 learning and then answer the problem below.

 

 

 Science

  • Seems like I may have been wrong with my weather forecast predicting rain for last week. If your rain gauge did not collect any rain then don't despair, store it safely until the weather turns again (which I'm sure it will at some point). this week we will continue investigating the weather, but this week we will look at measuring the wind speed.
  • Print off this wind speed gauge here on to thin card or stick it onto some card afterwards to make it stronger. So that we can compare the results that you record you need to number your gauge from 0 to 4, starting at the top of the gauge. 
  • Everyday at the same time go out with your gauge and check the wind speed. Record your results down in a results table. Either use the same graph making website as last week to display your results as a graph or draw your own on square paper. Label the x axis 'days of the week' and the y axis 'wind speed'. Were the results what you expected?

 

Theme

  • We have now spent a week looking at modern bicycles and a week looking at old fashioned penny farthings. now we are going to compare the 2. 
  • Split your page into 2 sections and label one 'penny farthing' and the other 'modern bicycles'. Find and stick in a picture of each and then write some sentences comparing them to each other. Think about how they looked, what parts they had, how safe they were, how comfortable they were and what they were made of. Use your work from the past few weeks to help you, as you already did the research then.

 

Art

  • Let's look at making something fun that you might want to use at your party this week. Lets make some 3D art by making a paper mache pinata. Although it takes a while to make as you have to let the paper mache dry before you paint it this is a really easy and fun activity for children. And all you need are a few basics like newspaper, flour, a balloon and things to decorate it with afterwards. Follow the simple instructions here to make your own.
  • When you have finished decorating your pinata fill it with some exciting things such as small toys, treats or just coloured paper confetti, seal up the hole and hang it up somewhere safe. Children (and adults) take turns to hit the pinata (carefully supervised!) until it bursts and reveals its surprise. This used to be one of my favourite activities to do when I was little with my sisters and cousin.

Wellbeing

  • Sometimes it can be hard being stuck in all day every day with our family, and it is only natural that sometimes we might fall out with each other. However, it is really important to show our family how much we love and appreciate them. 
  • Paint or draw your family tree. For some inspiration for how to set this out check out some ideas here. Under each person's name, write something you like or admire about them. When you're done, ask them to write something nice about you under your name.

Week beginning 04/05/20

Monday

Phonics:

  • Warm up with Grab a Giggling Grapheme game  of the correct level for your child.
  • Read a phonics comics  of the correct level for your child and discuss any new sounds or words they might have come across. 

English: 

Year 1 and Year 2

  • On Friday 8th May we have a bank holiday celebrating the 75th anniversary of VE day, which signified the end of World War 2. Therefore our work this week will be focusing on this theme of VE day. Today we are going to be looking at a reading comprehension sheet to give us some background information on VE day. All of the children are used to answering verbal questions based upon what they have read, but this may be the first time that they have done a reading comprehension worksheet. Work through it slowly and methodically with the children, helping them out with the trickier words.   Then have a look at the questions. Remind the children that the answers to the questions are in what they have just read, and they should look back in the passage to find the answer rather than just guessing. Also a general rule is that the order of the questions follows the order of the information, so a question at the end is likely to be about something at the end of the passage. Feel free to help your child by reading them the questions out loud. If your child is on RWI level red, green, pink or orange I would suggest the adult reads the passage out loud to the child while they follow with their finger, and for yellow and blue they can have a go at reading the passage themselves. For children on RWI level grey then they should try and read this passage themselves.

 

Maths:

Year 1:

  •  Today we are going to be looking at the symbols for greater than, less than and equal to. We looked at this a while ago, so refresh your memory with this helpful song all about it.
  • Now we are going to play a game using these symbols. Cut and and make this dice or write the symbol on cards for you to pick one at random for the game. Now chose a number from your hundred square or use this spinner to pick one for you. Then roll the dice to see what symbol you get. Finally you need to think of a correct number to complete your number sentence. So if for example you spun the number 27 and rolled > you could write 27 > 13. If you spun 5 and rolled < you could write 5 < 14. Continue with this game until you are confident using the symbols.

 Year 2:

  • Watch the song and make the dice just like Year 1. However, after playing the game a few times make it more tricky by having to think of an addition or subtraction to finish your number sentence. So for example if you spun 27 and rolled > you could write 27 > 22 - 4. This is more tricky so take your time and think carefully about what you are doing. Only move on to this when you are confident using the symbols.

 

Tuesday

Phonics: 

  • Warm up with flashcard speed trial  game, pressing the tick if your child correctly says the sound and a cross if they make a mistake.
  • Read a phonics comic  of the correct level for your child and discuss any new sounds or words they might have come across.

English:

Year 1:

  • A very important, but dangerous, job some people had during World War 2 was being a spy, and they often had to write in code. We will be looking at decoding some secret messages that rely of the order of the alphabet to decipher them. We need to do a bit of work on the alphabet first to make sure we have no problems. First write out the alphabet in order starting from a. Make sure you don't miss out any letters and think carefully about your letter formation. 
  • Now have a go at playing this alphabet game, can you rebuild the alphabet for them?
  • Now you are ready to try and crack the codes. Have a look at this sheet here for the code. In the box at the top you need to write the alphabet starting at a all the way to z. Then to read the code you look at the corresponding letter underneath. Can you solve all 3 of the messages? Use the code to write your own messages to friends and family, can they crack them?

Year 2:

  • A very important, but dangerous, job some people had during World War 2 was being a spy, and they often had to write in code. We will be looking at decoding some secret messages that rely of the order of the alphabet to decipher them. We need to do a bit of work on the alphabet first to make sure we have no problems. First write out the alphabet in order starting from a. Make sure you don't miss out any letters and think carefully about your letter formation. 
  • Now have a go at playing this game can you put the words into alphabetical order? If this was no problem for you, ask your adult to write some words for you to put in order and make it tricky by having some start with the same letter so that you have to look at the second letter.
  • Now you are ready to try and crack the codes. Have a look at this sheet here for the code. In the box at the top you need to write the alphabet starting at a all the way to z. Then to read the code you look at the corresponding letter underneath. Can you solve all 3 of the messages? Use the code to write your own messages to friends and family, can they crack them?

 

Maths:

Year 1:

  • We are carrying on looking greater than, less than and equal to today. Can you write down each symbol and explain them to an adult? Can you give them an example for each one?
  • Have a look at these number sentences. Something has happened to all of the symbols, they have disappeared! Could it be gremlins? Can you write them out but putting the correct symbol in? Remember to take your time and check your answers carefully as it is easy to make mistakes.

Year 2:

  • We are carrying on looking greater than, less than and equal to today. Can you write down each symbol and explain them to an adult? Can you give them an example for each one?
  • Have a look at these number sentences. Something has happened to all of the symbols, they have disappeared! Could it be gremlins? Can you write them out but putting the correct symbol in? Remember to take your time and check your answers carefully as it is easy to make mistakes.

 

 

Wednesday

Phonics:

  • Warm up with Tricky Word Trucks looking at HFW (high frequency words) of the correct level for your child.
  • Play Picnic on Pluto  game focusing on reading words and deciding if they are real or nonsense words. Can you beat your previous score?

English:

Year 1:

  • Now we are going to learn a little bit more about how people celebrated the original VE day. Have a look at this power point or do some google research about the parties that people had to celebrate 75 years ago if you can't access the power point. We are going to imagine that we were there at one of those parties and tomorrow we are going to write  a diary page describing what we saw. Today we are going to plan it.
  • Divide a piece of paper into 4 sections. Label them 'what I saw' 'what I heard' 'what I ate' and 'what I felt'. Imagine you have been to this VE celebratory party today. Fill in some adjectives and short sentences for each section, so that tomorrow when you write your diary you will have lots of ideas. Remember- the more you do today the easier it will be tomorrow!
  • Massive street party to be held in Bromsgrove to mark 75th VE Day

Year 2:

  • Complete the Year 1 work above but when writing your sentences try to include some expanded noun phrases. These sound tricky but are really simple. Instead of just writing 'I saw some flags' you add some adjectives into your sentence to describe the noun (in this case 'flags') such as 'I saw some bright, colourful flags'. Try using more than one adjective in your expanded noun phrase and put a comma between the 2 adjectives, just like in the above flag example.

 

Maths:

Year 1:

  • Now lets keep up with our work on greater than and less than but also introduce another element - money! At first glance this can look confusing, but actually it is very similar to what you have been doing all week. Work out how much the coins are showing by adding them up, you might want to write out the number sentence to help you do this or be confident without it. Once you have worked that out write the number next to the coins, and then it is just the same as yesterday! Doing activities like this help you to consolidate different areas of maths learning, but also show that you can apply your skills to different situations. 

 

Year 2:

  • Now lets keep up with our work on greater than and less than but also introduce another element - money! At first glance this can look confusing, but actually it is very similar to what you have been doing all week. Work out how much the coins are showing by adding them up, you might want to write out the number sentence to help you do this or be confident without it. Once you have worked that out write the number next to the coins, and then it is just the same as yesterday! Doing activities like this help you to consolidate different areas of maths learning, but also show that you can apply your skills to different situations. 

 

Thursday

Phonics:

  • Warm up with Tricky Word Trucks  this time looking at looking at tricky words (what RWI calls red words) of the correct level for your child.
  • Play Dragon’s Den game a different variation of Picnic on Pluto. Can you beat your previous score?

English:

Year 1:

  • Today we are gong to use our plan from yesterday to write our diary entry. To make it interesting start your writing off by writing 'Dear Diary', ten start describing the day at the VE party. Remember that diary entries are written in the first person (you use the pronouns 'I') and in the past tense eg 'I had a great time at the party'. Use your notes from yesterday to help make your writing interesting and try to add in 'and' to link some of your short sentences/phrases together. Always remember that fantastic writing always has capital letters, full stops, finger spaces, writing on the line and good letter formation. After you have finished your writing read it back to check that you haven't missed any of these out.

Year 2:

  • Write your diary entry like in the Year 1 section, remembering to include those expanded noun phrases that you planned yesterday. Can you try and add in an exclamation mark to make your work even more exciting. This should be after you write sometimes exciting or shocking, such as 'I ate 3 pieces of cake!' or 'I felt so happy that I cried!'

Maths:

Year 1 and Year 2:

  •  Lets now apply what you have learnt about greater than and less than, alongside your other knowledge about place value and numbers, and do some problem solving and reasoning. Here are 3 problems for you. You need to think carefully about your answers, and write a clear sentence explaining your answer. If you can do this it shows that you really understand this topic.

 

  

 Science

  •  We are now going to do an experiment looking at the weather, specifically looking at the amount of rainfall each day. According to my weather forecast on my phone it looks like it is going to get a bit wetter over the next week or so, so lets use this to investigate. Firstly you will need to make your very own rainfall gauge. Follow instructions here on how to make one. If you don't want to dig it into the ground either wedge it in place tightly or fill the bottom with some plasticine or blue tack to weigh it down.
  • Before you start can you make some sensible predictions about what might happen. Will every day have the same amount of rain? Why not? Will all days have some rain? Which day might have the most? Is this a random guess or did you use something to help you predict this?
  • Check on your rain gauge every day at the same time, this is important to ensure a fair test. Measure how much water is in it then empty it out so that you can start collecting for the next day. Create your own results table to keep your results in.
  • Keep measuring for at least a week, or as long as you fancy. When you are done collecting why not use this website to create a bar graph or pie chart of your results. Label the x axis 'days of the week' and the y axis 'amount of rainfall' and then fill in your results. Were the results what you expected them to be? Why could this be?

 

Theme

  • Before modern bikes were invented lots of people used penny farthings. Have a look at this picture of one. How does it different from a modern day bike? How is it the same?

  • Do some research on the penny farthing. Some example questions to think about include...How safe were they? Did they have brakes? Were they easy to ride? Who invented them? When and where were they invented? Why did people stop using them?
  • Display your research either as a leaflet about the penny farthing or as a poster. Try to include as least 4 facts in your work as well as titles, pictures and labels.

 

Art

  • This week we are going to look at doing some painting and you can paint whatever you want to,,,, but there is one rule- you are not allowed to use any paintbrushes! What else could you use to paint with. Have a hunt around both inside and outside of your house to collect some items that you could use instead of brushes (some of my favourite ideas are forks, sticks, lego bricks or vegetables cut into different shapes). Make sure you check with an adult before you put paint on any of them though! Can you use them just like a brush, or do you have to do more printing type work with them? Can you use a stick to make dots and do a picture in that way, like the famous artist Seurat. have a look at one of his dot paintings below.
  • Or maybe you don't want to use anything as a brush and just use your finger tips to paint. Can you recreate any of these fun animals using finger painting then drawing over the top when they are dry?

 

P.E.

  • Why not practise some fun yoga and listen to a story at the same time with Cosmic Yoga, there are loads of different stories to choose from. Check out their website or look on their youtube site for some great videos.
  • Also check out Joe Wicks body coach channel with lots of interesting work out videos. Plus at 9am every weekday Joe will be live streaming a kids P.E. lesson, so don't forget to tune in.
  • Check out our fabulous Highfield Primary P.E. and Sports page for more great sporting ideas

 

Week beginning 27/4/20:

Monday

Phonics:

  • Warm up with Grab a Giggling Grapheme game  of the correct level for your child.
  • Read a phonics comics  of the correct level for your child and discuss any new sounds or words they might have come across. 

English: 

Year 1:

  • Lots of us are disappointed that we couldn't go on holiday somewhere exciting this Easter holidays so we are going to go on an imagination trip this week. Everyone's trip will be different and I am looking forward to hearing about yours. 
  • Firstly you will need to decide on where you would like to pretend to go. Use this travel booking form here, or if you haven't got a printer ask a adult to help you make your own, and fill in all of the details.

Year 2:

  • Complete the year 1 work. Now draw a picture of your holiday destination, and label as many parts of your picture as you can. Remember, when labelling the writing always goes from left to right just like normal, no matter what side of the page the label line is.

 

Maths:

Year 1:

  • Today we are going to be recapping our working counting in 2s. Watch this fun active song to help remind you of your counting in 2s. Now try writing your counting by 2s out on a piece of paper. How high can you go to? 30? 50? Or even 100? Look at the numbers that you have just written and talk to your adult about the pattern that you spot. Is the pattern always the same or does it change ever?  

  • Have a go at writing out these sequences and filling in the missing numbers. These are challenging as we have done lots of work on counting by 2s already in school. Remember to think of the pattern, and think if the sequence is going forwards or backwards. Maybe use a hundred square to help you. If these are proving too tricky, ask an adult to write some simpler ones out for you to start with before moving back to these.

  • Show off what you have learnt by playing this duck game picking counting in 2s.

 Year 2:

  • Complete the year 1 work. Can you write out your counting by 2s going backwards starting from 30?
  • Show off what you have learnt with this balloon game, picking counting in 2s.

 

Tuesday

Phonics: 

  • Warm up with flashcard speed trial  game, pressing the tick if your child correctly says the sound and a cross if they make a mistake.
  • Read a phonics comic  of the correct level for your child and discuss any new sounds or words they might have come across.

English:

Year 1:

  • Now we have our destination we need to create our passport so that we are able to go there. We have looked at passports before so you should remember what one is. The most important thing is that the picture you draw and the description you write must match up, otherwise they won't let you on the plane!
  • Have a look at this passport template here to print off, or ask an adult to help make you one out of some paper. If you are using the template make sure your adult draws some lines on for you to write to keep our writing need and tidy. Fill out all the details in your passport, remembering to use lots of great adjectives (describing words) in the description of yourself. Maybe you could make one for all of your family?

Year 2:

  • When filling out your passport make sure that you try and include a connective in each sentence when appropriate. Examples of connectives could be 'and' 'but' and 'because'. Remember to only include one in each sentence, and they don't need a capital letter as they are just contonuing your setence, not starting a new one.

 

Maths:

Year 1:

  • We are now going to move on to recap counting in 10s. Watch this fun active song to help remind you of your counting in 10s. Remember to say the numbers clearly and not to say '20' when it should be '100' as this is a common mistake as children thin they are counting in their teens. Now try writing your counting by 10s out on a piece of paper. How high can you go to? Can you go higher than 100? Look at the numbers that you have just written and talk to your adult about the pattern that you spot. Is the pattern always the same or does it change ever?  
  • Have a go at filling in these sequences for counting in 10s. Think carefully about whether they are counting forwards or backwards in 10s.
  • Show off what you have learnt by playing this balloon game, picking counting in 10s.

Year 2:

  • Complete the year 1 work.
  • Challenge yourself with this tricky counting in 10s maze sheet. Start at 0 and count on in 10s until you reach the end.
  • Show off what you have learnt by playing this duck game picking counting in 10s

 

Wednesday

Phonics:

  • Warm up with Tricky Word Trucks looking at HFW (high frequency words) of the correct level for your child.
  • Play Picnic on Pluto  game focusing on reading words and deciding if they are real or nonsense words. Can you beat your previous score?

English:

Year 1:

  • Now we have decide where we are going and have our passport we need to decide what we are going to pack. You need to make a list of things to take with you. First of all at the top of the page write the title for your list. Make sure that you are using a writing pencil and lined paper so that your work can be as neat as possible.
  • When we are writing a list how do we set it out? Do we write it like we would write a story? No, each new item goes on a new line underneath the previous one, and we don't need to use capital letters. 
  • Once you have written your list read it over to check that you haven't forgotten anything. You could now draw an open suitcase and draw all of your items in the suitcase to show your 'packing'. Or you could play the packing word game with your family. The first person says 'I went on holiday and I packed...a toothbrush' then the next person says 'I went on holiday and I packed...a swimsuit and a toothbrush'. Keep adding on items but you must remember the order of the previous items. How many can you and your family remember?

Year 2:

  • Complete the year one work but challenge yourself when writing your list. Try adding a comma at the end of each item on your list, but practise this before hand. Remember the circle part of the comma should sit on the line with the tail reaching just underneath, but it should not look like the letter 'g'.

 

Maths:

Year 1:

  • As well as counting in 10s starting from 0 we need to be able to count in 10s from any given number. This is similar to the work we did last week looking at 10 more ad 10 less. Use splat square or a hundred square to chose a number between 1-9 and circle counting on in 10 until you get to the 90s.  What do you notice about the pattern this time? Which number is it that changes, the tens column or the ones column? You should notice that the tens column changes by 1 each time. Practise this a few times until you feel secure, going both forwards and backwards.

  • Have a go at writing out these sequences and filling in the missing numbers. Remember to think carefully about whether the sequences are going forwards or backwards, and you might find it useful at the start to have your 100sq near you.

Year 2:

  • As well as counting in 10s starting from 0 we need to be able to count in 10s from any given number. This is similar to the work we did last week looking at 10 more ad 10 less. Use splat square or a hundred square to chose a number between 1-9 and circle counting on in 10 until you get to the 90s.  What do you notice about the pattern this time? Which number is it that changes, the tens column or the ones column? You should notice that the tens column changes by 1 each time. Practise this a few times until you feel secure, going both forwards and backwards.
  • Now have a go at this worksheet looking at counting by 10s starting from any number.

 

Thursday

Phonics:

  • Warm up with Tricky Word Trucks  this time looking at looking at tricky words (what RWI calls red words) of the correct level for your child.
  • Play Dragon’s Den game a different variation of Picnic on Pluto. Can you beat your previous score?

English:

Year 1 and 2:

  • Today we are going to role play going on our holiday. Role play is an important tool in young children's learning, with a particular focus on the speaking and listening aspect of English. Remember to encourage your child to always speak in full sentences, look at the person who is talking, use topic related words (such as suitcase, ticket, passport etc) and respond appropriately to questions and other speakers, thinking carefully about their language and tone. 
  • To begin with imagine you are going on the flight, make sure you have your passport with you, and perhaps you could make yourself a ticket. Dressing up in appropriate clothes might help. You could create an aeroplane in your front room with the chairs and watch this video to pretend you are taking off.
  • Possible role play scenarios include- at the ticket office at the airport, passport control, on the plane, going to the hotel, on the beach etc. 

Maths:

Year 1:

  • Finally lets look at counting in 5s, this is the most tricky one and that's why we have left it to last! Warm up your counting with this fun and active song. Now try writing your counting by 5s out on a piece of paper. How high can you go to? Can you go to 50, or even 100? Look at the numbers that you have just written and talk to your adult about the pattern that you spot. Is the pattern always the same or does it change ever? 
  • Now lets have a look at some counting in 5s sequences. Warning- these are tricky. Do not get discouraged or give up, use your 100sq to help you and remember that pattern that you talked about as this will help you. If you find these too tricky to start with ask your adult to write you out some simpler ones to begin with before starting on these more challenging ones.
  • Show off what you have learnt by playing either this duck game or this balloon game, picking counting in 5s for both.

Year 2:

  • Finally lets look at counting in 5s, this is the most tricky one and that's why we have left it to last! Warm up your counting with this fun and active song. Now try writing your counting by 5s out on a piece of paper. How high can you go to? Can you go to 50, or even 100? Look at the numbers that you have just written and talk to your adult about the pattern that you spot. Is the pattern always the same or does it change ever? 
  • Now apply this knowledge to this worksheet thinking carefully about whether the sequence is going forwards of backwards. 

 

Friday

Phonics:

  • Warm up with flashcard speed trial game, pressing the tick if your child correctly says the sound and a cross if they make a mistake.
  • Play Help a Hedgehog speed word challenge game  to see how many words you can correctly read in the time. Can you beat your previous score?

English:

Year 1:

  • Today you are going to write a postcard to someone back home from your imagination holiday. Have you ever written or received a postcard? Do you have any examples in the house to have a look at? Why would someone write a postcard? How does it get to the person who receives it? Discuss all of this with your adult.
  • Now you are going to write your postcard. You can either make your won out of paper or card, or use this template here to help you. Remember to write about what you did on your trip on the left hand part and put the person's name and address on the left hand part. On the back you can draw a picture or stick a photograph on you on your trip. I wold love to see your finished postcards and photos of your imagination trips so please send them in to the class email address at the top of the page. 

Year 2:

  • When writing your postcard please include a day of the week when describing what you did. Remember, days of the week always start with a capital letter. If you are unsure of your days of the week, have a look at this fun game you can play.

 

Maths:

Year 1:

  • Recap your counting in 2s with this song here. Talk with your adult about the pattern that you spotted earlier in the week, can you remember what numbers need to end with to be in our counting by 2s? That's right, they must end in a 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8 only.
  • We call numbers that are in our counting by 2s 'multiples of 2', and that is what we are going to be looking at today. Ask your adult to write out lots of 2 digit numbers on a piece of paper. Can you circle the ones that are multiples of 2? Can you write a sentence explaining how you know they are/aren't multiples of 2? Can your adult challenge you by adding in some 3 digit numbers?
  • Try writing out your counting in 2s again, can you get higher than you did on Monday? 

Year 2:

  • Now that we have looked at 2s, 5s and 10s separately it is time to look at them altogether. Recap with an adult the patterns that you spotted for each of these sequences. Remember these as they will help you with your next part.
  • Now we are looking at something called a multiple. A multiple of 2 is something that is in our 2 times table, a multiple of 5 is in the 5 times table. Have a go at this multiples worksheet and think carefully about those patterns you spotted. How do you know it is a multiple or not?

 

 

 Science

  •  We are continuing with our theme of weather this week. Can you keep a weather diary for the week, thinking about things like sun, rain, clouds, wind etc? Is the weather always the same throughout the whole day or does it change? Do you have a thermometer at home? If so could you use it to record the temperature each day (remember the temperature is always taken in the shade not in the sun). How will you present your weather diary? At the end of the week could you draw any graphs such as bar graphs to model the different weather's seen.
  • Have a go at being a weather presenter yourself. If you have a map of the UK or England you can stick it to your wall, or print off this one here or draw your own. Create your own weather symbols that you can cut out and stick blue tack on to put on your map. Watch a real weather forecaster to see how they do it and then practise doing your own weather forecast (it does not have to be an accurate representation of the current weather!). Then perform it for your family, or see if they will film it so that you can watch it like a real weather forecast.

 

Theme

  • Bikes are a form of transport that were around almost 200 years ago, although they looked very different from bikes nowadays. Thinking about bikes in the present day, make a collage of as many different pictures of bikes that you can find,

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